Tag Archives: Wessex Archaeology

Kingsmead Quarry, Horton

The Horton Crest, designed by Andy Sole and Gareth Chaffey and drawn by Rob Goller

The Horton Crest, designed by Andy Sole and Gareth Chaffey and drawn by Rob Goller

One of the greatest projects I’ve had the privilege of working on over the years was the excavations at Kingsmead Quarry, Horton, undertaken by Wessex Archaeology over a twelve year period from 2003-2015 prior to mineral extraction of sand and gravel on the site.

To commemorate the successful completion of the project, the team have produced The Horton Crest, designed by Andy Sole and Gareth Chaffey and drawn by Rob Goller. Continue reading

Colonisation of Britain; Linked Data now live!

Late Upper Palaeolithic long blades

Late Upper Palaeolithic long blades by Wessex Archaeology

A while back, I was commissioned by Wessex Archaeology to undertake the Linked Data component of the Colonisation of Britain project. The broader project, funded by English Heritage, involved the digitisation of the archives of the late Roger Jacobi and production of enhanced database/GIS resources now archived at the ADS.

The Linked Data component involved the production of a Linked Data resource based on the Colonisation of Britain database/GIS to be included in Archaeology Data Service (ADS) Linked Data repository. I am very pleased to announce this data is now live! Continue reading

Stonehenge Environmental Improvements Project wins award

Inside the stone circle

Inside the stone circle

Chris Blandford Associates (CBA) have won an award from the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) for their work on the Stonehenge Environmental Improvements Project (SEIP). Continue reading

Colonisation of Britain

Colonisation of Britain Linked Data

Colonisation of Britain Linked Data

The Colonisation of Britain project was undertaken by Wessex Archaeology, commissioned by English Heritage, and involved the digitisation of the archive material of Roger Jacobi.

The project aimed to provide a comprehensive survey of the Upper Palaeolithic resource, with a pilot study of the Mesolithic in England involving three counties. A comprehensive survey of these periods (c.38,000-c 6500 BP) was considered of particular importance because many of the sites and find spots represent evidence for the recolonisation of Britain after the Last Glacial Maximum by hominid groups. Unlike earlier recolonisations this event is part of the most northerly early migration of social groups of anatomically modern humans.

The major primary source of data for the survey is the invaluable and extensive archive compiled over many years by the late Dr Roger Jacobi. Securing this archive was identified as a priority in itself. The project included the digitisation of the Jacobi Archive, both as an image dataset and as a structured relational database, enhanced with additional information from SMR/HERs.

One of the outputs from the project is a Linked Data version of the outputs and Archaeogeomancy were pleased to be commissioned to undertake this component. Continue reading

When Prehistoric Farming Begins: Kingsmead Quarry, Horton

Archaeological excavations in a quarry

Archaeological excavations in a quarry

Whilst working for Wessex Archaeology, I was privileged to play a minor part in a project which, over the course of numerous seasons of excavation, has proven to be rather exciting. Under the careful management of Gareth Chaffey and Alistair Barclay supported by a broad team of field archaeologists and other specialists, the site at Kingsmead Quarry, Horton (Berks) has given plenty of evidence for life over the last 12,000 years since the last ice age, particularly for Neolithic through to Bronze Age activities. Continue reading

Linked Data vocabularies for cultural heritage

Linked Data cloud by Anja Jentzsch

Linked Data cloud by Anja Jentzsch

Colleagues from the Hypermedia Research Unit at the University of South Wales have been working hard on the Seneschal project of late (also see here for more info about the project) and a key output has been released this week, comprising a range of cultural heritage vocabularies expressed as Linked Open Data. For those who attended the Hestia event on Thursday, Keith May gave a bit of a sneak preview. Continue reading

So long and thanks for all the fish… Hello G-STAR!

So long and thanks for all the fish...

So long and thanks for all the fish…

After over five years as the Geomatics Manager for Wessex Archaeology, I have now left to start a PhD in computer science, investigating geosemantic tools for archaeological research (G-STAR) based in the Hypermedia Research Unit at the University of Glamorgan with input from the Geographical Information Systems Research Unit. Continue reading

St Andrew’s, Holcombe – geomatics and geophysics in action!

Archaeological Survey at St Andrew’s Church, Holcombe, Somerset

Archaeological Survey at St Andrew’s Church, Holcombe, Somerset using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Total Station Theodolites (TST), Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI)

There are still some places left on tomorrow’s geomatics and geophysics and RTI events over at St Andrew’s Church, Holcombe, Somerset; see the project website for full details.

And don’t forget there are a whole series of talks, opportunities to speak to some real life archaeologists and a flying demonstration of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), all on this Saturday afternoon (21st July).

Festival of British Archaeology

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). Image courtesy of Callen Lenz.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). Image courtesy of Callen Lenz.

This year, as part of the Festival of British Archaeology, I am very lucky to be managing a dream geomatics project which has a load of associated special events for the Festival. As a frustrated pilot and a well known geek, I love my gadgets, particularly those which fly. Well, this year, all my Christmas’s have come at once. Continue reading

Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology, 2011

The Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference, UK Chapter meeting (CAAUK) was held at Birmingham University this weekend. Some great papers presented and a good time had by all. The Programme and Abstracts booklet is on the conference website and also available here. Continue reading