Tag Archives: TLS

Digital Past 2014

Laser scanning

Laser scanning a historic building

The call for papers is now out for the Digital Past 2014 conference, now in its sixth year. Time really has flown since I was privileged to speak at the first conference back in 2009 and the conference has grown in strength year on year. The main themes this time are Technical Survey and Deliverables, two excellent subject areas. Continue reading

3D Laser Scanning: Seeking a New Standard in Documentation

Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS)

Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS)

The Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) and the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS) are organising a workshop to look at the preservation of laser scan data.

The event is described thus:

The Digital Preservation Coalition and the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland invite you to join them at a workshop to explore the preservation of 3d laser scan data.

Current best practice guidance for the long term preservation of 3D laser scan data, in particular the required metadata is found to be onerous by data creators. This workshop will bring together leading practitioners from the archaeological community, alongside leading data archivists and software suppliers in the UK and Ireland to work towards agreeing a new metadata standard to facilitate preservation.

This event will allow for communication between archivists, creators and purveyors of software and hardware for laser scanning, as well as equipment manufacturers.  The aim is to ensure that the export of metadata is much simpler and more convenient for users. Continue reading

Archaeological survey at Sandsfoot Castle; recording one of Henry VIII’s castles

GIM 09/2012 cover featuring Archaeological Survey at Sandsfoot Castle

GIM International, September 2012 cover featuring Archaeological Survey at Sandsfoot Castle

The latest issue of GIM International contains a feature article on one of the projects I managed for Wessex Archaeology. The article talks about some of the tools, techniques and technologies used on this and other archaeological survey projects these days.

Archaeologists nowadays have a broad range of geomatics tools and techniques available to help them in their work. Whilst measuring tapes and dumpy levels are still essential instruments found on archaeological sites across the world, many projects now include Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), robotic Total Station Theodolites (TST) and a variety of photographic and photogrammetric methods. Spatial data is then handled in 2D and 3D using CAD and GIS. These modern tools allow archaeologists to record our heritage with greater precision and faster than ever before whilst producing rich spatial data for visualisation and analysis.

For more information on the project, see the Wessex Archaeology case study.

For more information on the castle itself, see the website of the Friends of Sandsfoot Castle and the Rodwell Trail.

St Andrew’s, Holcombe – geomatics and geophysics in action!

Archaeological Survey at St Andrew’s Church, Holcombe, Somerset

Archaeological Survey at St Andrew’s Church, Holcombe, Somerset using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Total Station Theodolites (TST), Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI)

There are still some places left on tomorrow’s geomatics and geophysics and RTI events over at St Andrew’s Church, Holcombe, Somerset; see the project website for full details.

And don’t forget there are a whole series of talks, opportunities to speak to some real life archaeologists and a flying demonstration of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), all on this Saturday afternoon (21st July).

Festival of British Archaeology

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). Image courtesy of Callen Lenz.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). Image courtesy of Callen Lenz.

This year, as part of the Festival of British Archaeology, I am very lucky to be managing a dream geomatics project which has a load of associated special events for the Festival. As a frustrated pilot and a well known geek, I love my gadgets, particularly those which fly. Well, this year, all my Christmas’s have come at once. Continue reading

Archaeological Computing Research Group Seminar, May 23rd 2012

I’ve been meaning to have a proper go with Storify for a while now and so have taken the opportunity to document a recent talk I gave and some follow up discussions. As usual, presentation itself is on Slideshare.
Continue reading

CAA 2012 Southampton

Computer applications and quantitative methods in Archaeology (CAA) 2012

CAA 2012 Southampton

CAA 2012 Southampton

The 2012 conference in rapidly approaching and next year, unlike the past few years, it is being held close to home, for me at least; hosted by the Archaeological Computing Research Group at the University of Southampton.

Geoff Avern and I are running a session looking at 3D archaeology and since the call for papers has been extended, there is still time to get a paper in should you wish to via the online submissions system. Continue reading

Heritage in 3D

Following on from my last post, I’ve posted my presentation given at this years CAA UK conference to Slideshare. The subject was the use of terrestrial and airborne laser scanning in heritage contexts and made use of a number of case studies from work, which will shortly be published on the Wessex Archaeology computing blog in more detail. Continue reading