Category Archives: Teaching and Training

Arches @ Google Summer of Code

Google Summer of Code 2014

Google Summer of Code 2014

Edmund Lee (Knowledge Transfer Manager at English Heritage) announced on the Antiquist list that the Arches project has been accepted onto the Google Summer of Code 2014. This is great news and a great opportunity for students to get involved with this trailblazing Getty Conservation Institute / World Monuments Fund project through the mega event that is the Summer of Code – a double whammy! Continue reading

GIS training opportunity: Lancaster Summer School in Interdisciplinary Digital Methods

Spatial Humanities at Lancaster

Spatial Humanities at Lancaster

Following on from their previous successful events (see here and here), the good folks in the Spatial Humanities team at Lancaster University are organising a GIS course as part of a broader summer school in digital methods. Continue reading

GIS software for the Digital Humanities: A free two-day workshop

Spatial Humanities at Lancaster

Spatial Humanities at Lancaster

Following on from their previous event, the good folks at Lancaster University are running another seminar in April.

Such opportunities are few and far between and GIS training can be costly so I would thoroughly recommend taking advantage of this if at all possible. Continue reading

GIS in the Digital Humanities

Spatial Humanities at Lancaster

Spatial Humanities at Lancaster

The good folks from the Spatial Humanities Project based at Lancaster University are running a free one day seminar in November. This is only part of their outreach activities which also feature an informative YouTube channel and other learning resources. Continue reading

Practical Applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in the Historic Environment

earthorama by spdorsey

earthorama by spdorsey

I will be teaching at the University of Oxford Department for Continuing Education next May. The one day course is being directed by Andrew Lowerre (English Heritage) and features contributions from Michael Charno (Archaeology Data Service), myself (Wessex Archaeology), Abby Hunt (Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales), Stuart Jeffrey (Archaeology Data Service), Sarah Poppy (Suffolk County Council) and Ken Welsh (Oxford Archaeology).

GIS is now widely used in historic environment research and management. Beyond regular users of GIS, however, there is often limited understanding of what GIS is and how it works, what it can and cannot do, and the advantages and costs of using GIS. This course seeks to provide an overview of current usage, pitfalls and potential benefits of utilising GIS.

The course is designed for historic environment professionals, principally those involved in research, fieldwork and the planning process and who are aware of GIS, but who have little or no practical experience with its use.

Please see the course webpage for contact details and booking.

Thinking beyond the tool; Archaeological computing and the interpretive process

Thinking Beyond The Tool

Thinking Beyond The Tool

It seems like so long ago now, but selected papers from TAG 2010 have now been published in the BAR publication Thinking beyond the tool; Archaeological computing and the interpretive process. Many thanks to Angeliki, Paty & Costas for all their hard work editing the volume. Continue reading

What Does it Take to Get that Archaeology Job? GIS…?

I love GIS!

I love GIS!

It is indeed interesting that this post on Doug’s Archaeology regarding jobs in archaeology, specifically management jobs in archaeology, mentions GIS. GIS skills/qualifications in archaeology is a particular area of interest of mine.

In the UK, GIS is used for many tasks from resource management (eg Historic Environment Records) to undertaking Desk Based Assessments (DBAs) and Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs). As such, a requirement for GIS appears more and more often on job adverts in the public and commercial sectors, at least for jobs that involve ‘doing’ rather than ‘managing’. True, management jobs typically do not mention GIS unless they are considered ‘technical’ posts. This often means archaeology managers are responsible for staff who use GIS yet may not understand or appreciate what their staff are doing. Continue reading