Category Archives: Panoramas and Bubbleworlds

Archaeological survey at Sandsfoot Castle; recording one of Henry VIII’s castles

GIM 09/2012 cover featuring Archaeological Survey at Sandsfoot Castle

GIM International, September 2012 cover featuring Archaeological Survey at Sandsfoot Castle

The latest issue of GIM International contains a feature article on one of the projects I managed for Wessex Archaeology. The article talks about some of the tools, techniques and technologies used on this and other archaeological survey projects these days.

Archaeologists nowadays have a broad range of geomatics tools and techniques available to help them in their work. Whilst measuring tapes and dumpy levels are still essential instruments found on archaeological sites across the world, many projects now include Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), robotic Total Station Theodolites (TST) and a variety of photographic and photogrammetric methods. Spatial data is then handled in 2D and 3D using CAD and GIS. These modern tools allow archaeologists to record our heritage with greater precision and faster than ever before whilst producing rich spatial data for visualisation and analysis.

For more information on the project, see the Wessex Archaeology case study.

For more information on the castle itself, see the website of the Friends of Sandsfoot Castle and the Rodwell Trail.

Thinking beyond the tool; Archaeological computing and the interpretive process

Thinking Beyond The Tool

Thinking Beyond The Tool

It seems like so long ago now, but selected papers from TAG 2010 have now been published in the BAR publication Thinking beyond the tool; Archaeological computing and the interpretive process. Many thanks to Angeliki, Paty & Costas for all their hard work editing the volume. Continue reading

Stonehenge; photosynth

Rather than a traditional panorama, this makes use of the photosynth capability of the photosynth platform. Taken around Stonehenge, this synth comprises 150 photos taken on a single visit. Sometime soon, I’ll do a mega synth of all my Stonehenge photos.