Category Archives: Conferences

Introduction to 3D GIS and BIM 2017

Flux Seed by Steve Jurvetson

Flux Seed by Steve Jurvetson

Kelvin Wong of UCL is organising an Introduction to 3D GIS and BIM. This free event promises to be a great introduction to the subject and as of today (09/01/2017) there are only three places remaining so book pronto!

The day will be split into two parts. The morning session will focus on 3D GIS, starting with a short lecture introducing the topic, followed by an overview of current research trends in 3D GIS. This will be followed by a practical session where you’ll learn how to create a 3D City Model using FME software, and visualise this model in Esri’s ArcScene.

The afternoon session will commence with a short introduction to Building Information Modelling and how it is similar to, and different from, 3D GIS. This will be followed by a second lecture on approaches to integrating BIM and GIS. You’ll be given an opportunity to undertake a small BIM/GIS integration task using software including Autodesk Revit, FME and ArcScene, and at the end of the day, you’ll have integrated the 3D City Model from the morning session with the BIM data from the afternoon session.

The event is free to attend. Places are limited, and will be allocated on a first-come first-served basis (20 in total – you will be waitlisted if you are not allocated a place). You are expected to have some GIS experience (e.g. using ESRI tools) to participate and will have an interest in both GIS and BIM.

Linked Data: From interoperable to interoperating

Piazza Mercato, Siena

Piazza Mercato, Siena

Videos of all the presentations in this CAA session, held in Siena 2015, which I blogged about earlier. Full credit and thanks due to Doug Rocks-Macqueen and his Recording Archaeology project for recording and making this and other sessions available (see also the session on ArchaeoFOSS and the keynotes). Thanks also to Leif Isaksen and Keith May for organising and chairing the session.

The session outline:

Linked Data and Semantic Web based approaches to data management have now become commonplace in the field of heritage. So commonplace in fact, that despite frequent mention in digital literature, and a growing familiarity with concepts such as URIs and RDF across the domain, it is starting to see fall off in Computer Science conferences and journals as many of the purely technical issues are seen to be ‘solved’. So is the revolution over? We propose that until the benefits of Linked Data are seen in real interconnections between independent systems it will not properly have begun. This session will discuss the socio-technical challenges required to build a concrete Semantic Web in the heritage sector.

The videos for the accepted papers:

  • The Syrian Heritage Project in the IT infrastructure of the German Archaeological InstitutePhilipp Gerth, Sebastian Cuy (video)
  • Using CIDOC CRM for dynamically querying ArSol, a relational database, from the semantic webOlivier Marlet, Stéphane Curet, Xavier Rodier, Béatrice Bouchou-Markhoff (video)
  • How to move from Relational to Linked Open Data 5 Star – a numismatic exampleKarsten Tolle, David Wigg-Wolf (video)
  • The Labeling System: A bottom-up approach for enriched vocabularies in the humanitiesFlorian Thiery, Thomas Engel (video)
  • From interoperable to interoperating Geosemantic resourcesPaul J Cripps, Douglas Tudhope (video)

Continue reading

From interoperable to interoperating Geosemantic resources

Ospedale Psichiatrico - the conference venue, aka the Asylum...

Ospedale Psichiatrico – the conference venue, aka (rather appropriately, perhaps) the Asylum…


Following on from my earlier post on CAA2015, my presentation entitled From interoperable to interoperating Geosemantic resources is now available on YouTube thanks to Doug Rocks-Macqueen and his Recording Archaeology project. Indeed, there are a whole collection of presentations from the conference (and numerous others conferences) available, all thanks to Doug’s dedication; his work is a great asset to the community and the growing resource he is creating is of enormous benefit so all thanks due to Doug.
Continue reading

GSTAR @ Computer Applications in Archaeology (CAA) 2015

Conference

Conference

Following on from my presentation at CAA2014 in Paris, I was invited to submit a paper to a session at CAA2015 covering Linked Data (LD) and focussing on the difference between being theoretically interoperable and interoperating in practice. Continue reading

Digital Past 2015

Digital Past 2015

Digital Past 2015

The details for the 2015 conference and call for contributions are available, with dates added to the calendar.

Digital Past is a two day conference which showcases innovative digital technologies for data capture, interpretation and dissemination of heritage sites and artefacts. Running for the seventh year, Digital Past 2015 will be held throughout the spectacular Guildhall, incorporating Brangwyn Hall, in the waterfront city of Swansea. The event will offer a combination of papers, seminars and hands-on workshops and demonstrations to investigate the latest technical survey and interpretation techniques and their practical application in heritage interpretation, education and conservation.

The call for contributions document as circulated is available in English and Welsh.

TACOS: 21st Century Geospatial #HistEnv Data Management

TACOS – the event

On 14 May 2014 the Council for British Archaeology (CBA) hosted a one day seminar on behalf of FISH and HEIRNET at the University of York to discuss common issues facing the historic environment information sector and make progress towards a shared vision and agenda for historic environment information management.

The TACOS keynotes, discussions and demonstrations will build upon a ‘show and tell’ event (the NACHOS seminar) held at the British Museum in November 2012, which identified the need for integration of information sources in support of the National Heritage Protection Plan (NHPP). The seminar will investigate current historic environment information management practices and identify areas for improvement through cross-sector collaboration.

Aims

5 Taco plate by ulterior epicure

Tacos

The key aims of the seminar were to:

  • Encourage discussion between different groups that produce and manage historic environment information from across the sector (professional, research and voluntary to identify common goals and issues
  • Develop information sharing networks and working partnerships across the sector to pool resources in the areas of skills development and application of information technology

There’s more info on the event (aims, topics, etc) here. Continue reading

CAA2014: Ontologies and standards for improving interoperability of archaeological data: from models towards practical experiences in various contexts

CAA2014 banner

CAA2014 banner

Overview:

The session was organised by Anne-Violaine Szabados, Katell Briatte, Maria Emilia Masci, and Christophe Tufféry. Reinhard Foertsch and Sebastian Rahtz chaired the session. Continue reading

GSTAR @ CAA2014

Eiffel Tower

Eiffel Tower

On Thursday 24th April, I gave a presentation on my PhD research project (GSTAR) to the 2014 Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference, Paris, France. The presentation formed part of the session S07 Ontologies and standards for improving interoperability of archaeological data: from models towards practical experiences in various contexts organised by Anne-Violaine Szabados, Katell Briatte, Maria Emilia Masci, and Christophe Tufféry. Reinhard Foertsch and Sebastian Rahtz chaired the session.

Some notes on the session can be found here. Continue reading

Archaeology Blogging Carnival for SAA 2014

An archaeology blogging carnival for SAA2014

An archaeology blogging carnival for SAA2014

Doug Rocks-Macqueen is running an archaeology blogging carnival to coincide with the 2014 SAA conference which features a Blogging in Archaeology session. For full details see Doug’s blog post. In the run up to the session, a question will be posted each month and folk will reply through the medium of their blogs. Neat idea, eh?

As each question arises, I will do my best to respond to some or all of them, time permitting. Given the broad range of blogging archaeologists out there, there should be a varied and interesting bunch of responses. Hopefully a great contribution to the conference session.

There’s also the hashtag #blogarch for the carnival and the conference session.