Stonehenge déjà vu; the A303, tunnelling, dualling and the feeling we’ve been here before…

Stonehenge: a World Heritage Site, a complex landscape not just an isolated stone circle

Stonehenge: a World Heritage Site, a complex landscape not just an isolated stone circle

Stonehenge is back in the news again. Following the unceremonious dropping of the last major scheme on grounds of cost, the government have now announced the A303 will get an upgrade, including a tunnel at Stonehenge.

This blog post has been hanging around for some time now so is rather less current than once it was. But unfortunately, blogging on topics other than research and commercial activities are necessarily lower on my priority list at present… Continue reading

Android Storage: SDHC and SDXC

Storage by Dominik Bartsch

Storage by Dominik Bartsch

Ever wondered why there is a 32gb limit on storage cards on many Android devices? If you, like me, have a lot of data you want on your mobile device (business docs, music and map data in my case) and found this a bit restrictive, you’ll be pleased to know there is a workaround. Continue reading

Maplets – static images of maps for use in applications

Toolbox by Florian Richter

Toolbox by Florian Richter

For a while now, I’ve been using the Data Driven Pages functionality of ArcGIS to output static maps, indexed by feature, to include in database driven applications such as MS Access and/or dynamic websites including Content Management Systems. This is a neat way of providing contextual location information on forms and reports in Access or on webpages without having to deploy GIS.

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Colonisation of Britain; Linked Data now live!

Late Upper Palaeolithic long blades

Late Upper Palaeolithic long blades by Wessex Archaeology

A while back, I was commissioned by Wessex Archaeology to undertake the Linked Data component of the Colonisation of Britain project. The broader project, funded by English Heritage, involved the digitisation of the archives of the late Roger Jacobi and production of enhanced database/GIS resources now archived at the ADS.

The Linked Data component involved the production of a Linked Data resource based on the Colonisation of Britain database/GIS to be included in Archaeology Data Service (ADS) Linked Data repository. I am very pleased to announce this data is now live! Continue reading

Extending CRMEH with GeoSPARQL

One of the outputs from the Pilot Study was an approach to working with geospatial data within the broader framework provided by the CIDOC CRM ontology and the CRMEH archaeological extension. Whilst there is ongoing work by myself and others to add archaeological and spatio-temporal components directly to the CIDOC CRM, for the purposes of the GSTAR project, a lightweight approach has been developed and deployed to suit the needs of the project; CRMEH already adds archaeological excavation capabilities and the spatial extension presented here gives a range of geospatial capabilities, as provided by a mapping to GeoSPARQL.

Parential Advisory by Michel Dumontier

Parential Advisory by Michel Dumontier

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From MPhil to PhD; GSTAR update

After a longer than anticipated gestation, my Transfer Report has left my hands and is working its way through the administrative system to be externally examined. Fingers crossed, this is one of my last posts as an MPhil student and I will soon (post viva) be a PhD student proper.

Time for some celebratory fireworks!

Time for some celebratory fireworks!

The Transfer Report included a condensed form of the literature review and also a detailed report on Pilot Study. This Pilot Study was designed to lay sound foundations for the PhD research and involved implementing a system using geosemantic technologies, primarily to investigate ways in which semantic and geospatial data can work together but also to help me get to grips with the subject area and technologies available.

The full report will be made available in due course, once it has been examined (viva scheduled for end of November) and any corrections completed, but for now here is an update on some of the key findings of the Pilot Study and conclusions drawn.
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The United Kingdom; a sense of place

Slightly off topic…

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about the goings on in Scotland; the referendum and the idea of independence. It’s been a hot topic on Twitter and Facebook and with many Scottish friends on both sides of the debate and with obvious ramifications for the UK as a whole, it’s hard not to take an interest. And whilst I am very much English as English can be (excepting my Geordie heritage and ultimately Scandinavia origins), do not live in Scotland and never have and therefore, some might suggest, I do not have much of a claim to speak on this matter, I do feel there is some deeper relevance of ideas relating to space and place of the kind often discussed by eminent scholars such as Yi-Fu Tuan. This is my tangential hook into the debate. So whilst not strictly pertaining to the usual technological topics of this blog, I do feel a bit of humanistic geography is directly relevant to the broader debate regarding the future of Great Britain and United Kingdom. Continue reading

ScARF Directory of Archaeological Scientists

The Scottish Archaeological Research Framework

The Scottish Archaeological Research Framework

ScARF is the Scottish Archaeological Research Framework, yet another forward thinking move from our heritage colleagues north of the border. I never cease to be amazed by the good work emanating from up there; Scotland certainly blazes a trail for cultural heritage, a shining example of how to crack on and get good things done.

ScARF is described as follows:

The Scottish Archaeological Research Framework (ScARF) reflects the current state of knowledge regarding Scotland’s past. As understanding of the past changes, so too will ScARF. It should be seen as a live document that will be constantly updated, edited and improved. The people developing ScARF are the people who use it: those who research Scotland’s past for enjoyment, employment, or frequently both.

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Digital Past 2015

Digital Past 2015

Digital Past 2015

The details for the 2015 conference and call for contributions are available, with dates added to the calendar.

Digital Past is a two day conference which showcases innovative digital technologies for data capture, interpretation and dissemination of heritage sites and artefacts. Running for the seventh year, Digital Past 2015 will be held throughout the spectacular Guildhall, incorporating Brangwyn Hall, in the waterfront city of Swansea. The event will offer a combination of papers, seminars and hands-on workshops and demonstrations to investigate the latest technical survey and interpretation techniques and their practical application in heritage interpretation, education and conservation.

The call for contributions document as circulated is available in English and Welsh.

Between the Monuments, Avebury, 2014

Panorama of one of the trenches

Panorama of one of the trenches

Following on from previous work, the team from the Universities of Leicester and Southampton were back at Avebury for the 2014 season of the Between the Monuments project, returning once again to the West Kennet Avenue. Continue reading