Yearly Archives: 2011

CAA 2012 Southampton

Computer applications and quantitative methods in Archaeology (CAA) 2012

CAA 2012 Southampton

CAA 2012 Southampton

The 2012 conference in rapidly approaching and next year, unlike the past few years, it is being held close to home, for me at least; hosted by the Archaeological Computing Research Group at the University of Southampton.

Geoff Avern and I are running a session looking at 3D archaeology and since the call for papers has been extended, there is still time to get a paper in should you wish to via the online submissions system. Continue reading

3d Laser Scanning for Heritage; 2nd Edition

3D Laser Scanning for Heritage

3D Laser Scanning for Heritage

As I posted recently, the new revised edition of the laser scanning guidance from English Heritage has now been published.

The new version features features three case studies based on Wessex Archaeology projects. More information on these projects can be found on the geomatics case studies pages at the Wessex Achaeology website.

The document can be downloaded as a pdf from the English Heritage website here.

Augmented reality

I’ve been avidly watching developments in AR over the past decade, waiting patiently to see something really cool. Well, the technology has evolved and the brilliant Stu Eve has now done something very cool: Augmented a Roman Fort.

Augmenting a Roman Fort from Dead Men’s Eyes on Vimeo.

Continue reading

What Does it Take to Get that Archaeology Job? GIS…?

I love GIS!

I love GIS!

It is indeed interesting that this post on Doug’s Archaeology regarding jobs in archaeology, specifically management jobs in archaeology, mentions GIS. GIS skills/qualifications in archaeology is a particular area of interest of mine.

In the UK, GIS is used for many tasks from resource management (eg Historic Environment Records) to undertaking Desk Based Assessments (DBAs) and Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs). As such, a requirement for GIS appears more and more often on job adverts in the public and commercial sectors, at least for jobs that involve ‘doing’ rather than ‘managing’. True, management jobs typically do not mention GIS unless they are considered ‘technical’ posts. This often means archaeology managers are responsible for staff who use GIS yet may not understand or appreciate what their staff are doing. Continue reading

Microsoft Academic Search

Microsoft have followed Google and their Google Scholar search tool into the academic arena with the Microsoft Academic Search platform. Based on a whole range of experimental technologies being developed by the software giant, the platform promises much for those of us interested in academic research. Continue reading

Nikon iSpace for Archaeology

Nikon iSpace system

Nikon iSpace system

This week, I was invited to a demonstration at Fort Cumberland of a new system for archaeological recording: Nikon’s iSpace for Archaeology being presented by Dr Geoff Avern of Southampton University. Continue reading

Interactive Landscape Relighting

There’s a short article in the Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society’s Archaeology Special Interest Group Spring 2011 Newsletter looking briefly at how archaeologists can investigate landscapes using digital techniques, co-authored by Tom Goskar and myself. Using Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) techniques it is possible to look in detail at surface morphology of Digital Surface Models (DSMs) by creating Polynomial Texture Maps (PTMs) representing parts of or even entire landscapes which can then be dynamically relit, a process Tom has named Interactive Landscape Relighting. Continue reading

Heritage in 3D

Following on from my last post, I’ve posted my presentation given at this years CAA UK conference to Slideshare. The subject was the use of terrestrial and airborne laser scanning in heritage contexts and made use of a number of case studies from work, which will shortly be published on the Wessex Archaeology computing blog in more detail. Continue reading

Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology, 2011

The Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference, UK Chapter meeting (CAAUK) was held at Birmingham University this weekend. Some great papers presented and a good time had by all. The Programme and Abstracts booklet is on the conference website and also available here. Continue reading

Leylines by vaXzine

The Magical Mystical Leyline Locator

Leylines by vaXzine

Leylines by vaXzine

Tom Scott has produced this fantastic resource for finding out if you live on a leyline; simply enter your postcode and the application will show you leylines passing through that location overlain on a GoogleMap. Go on, have a go! Continue reading